Developmental hourglass in plant and animal embryogenesis

  • 58
  • 12
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    70
    Shares

Embryogenesis has evolved independently in plants and animals. Comparative studies in animals have pointed towards an hourglass pattern of embryo development where early events are less conserved across species but lead to a highly conserved middle period, before diversifying again.

Comparison of the morphological and transcriptome hourglass model between flowering plants and animals. In both panels, embryogenesis proceeds from the bottom to the top (early, mid and late stages), and the width represents the morphological and transcriptome diversity.
Comparison of the morphological and transcriptome hourglass model between flowering plants and animals. In both panels, embryogenesis proceeds from the bottom to the top (early, mid and late stages), and the width represents the morphological and transcriptome diversity. For more details see: Cridge et al. 2016

Cridge et al. explore comparative morphological studies and more recent molecular work in plants to ask if a similar hourglass pattern of embryogenesis exists. They then discuss what convergent evolution of such a pattern in plants and animals tells us about the developmental constraints imposed upon embryogenesis and the evolution of the underlying gene regulatory networks.

Reference

Andrew G. Cridge, Peter K. Dearden, Lynette R. Brownfield, 2016, 'Convergent occurrence of the developmental hourglass in plant and animal embryogenesis?', Annals of Botany, vol. 117, no. 5, pp. 833-843 http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcw024


  • 58
  • 12
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    70
    Shares