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Saturday, April 4, 2020

Philip White

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http://www.hutton.ac.uk/staff/philip-white
Philip J. White is a Researcher in Plant Nutritional Genomics at The James Hutton Institute (UK) and a Professor of Biology at King Saud University (Saudi Arabia). Since 2014 he has been designated a “Highly Cited Researcher in Plant and Animal Sciences” by Clarivate Analytics. You can follow him on Twitter @plant_ionome2.

On the Virtues of Libraries and Insightful Reviewers

Contemporary Citation Classics: Winkel-Shirley, B (2001) Flavonoid biosynthesis. A colorful model for genetics, biochemistry, cell biology, and biotechnology. Plant Physiology 126, 485-493....

Can Early Career Researchers write reviews? The case of Zinc.

Philip White talks to Martin Broadley about how they wrote some highly-cited reviews as Early Career Researchers.

Reflections on “Chlorophyll fluorescence – a practical guide”

Philip White talks to Giles Johnson and finds out that what some people call a waste of time, other people call a citation classic.

Bibliometrics of Biofortification

Biofortification is a growing field of research. Philip White dives into the bibliometrics to see what nutrients and what crops are of particular interest at the moment.

Contemporary Citation Classic: Flowers TJ (2004) Improving crop salt tolerance. Journal of Experimental Botany 55, 307-319.

Philip White writes: Recently, I compiled a list of contemporary Citation Classics in Plant Sciences. My intention was not just to identify key papers...

Contemporary Citation Classics – Subjects and Predictions

Philip White takes a peek into the future. What papers are likely to become 'citation classics'?

Contemporary Citation Classics in Plant Sciences – Journals, Authors and Affiliations

Previously I described the compilation of a list of 517 contemporary Citation Classics in Plant Sciences (1992-2017) and tempted the reader with the prospect...

Citation Classics in Plant Sciences since 1992

Philip White asks what are the classic papers in plant sciences, and highlights a method that allows you to produce your own lists for your field or sub-field.

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