Wise men (and women) in the January Annals of Botany

a stem of Boswellia papyrifera in Ethiopia being tapped in order to collect frankincense, a gum-resin that the tree exudes when the bark is wounded. The resin, which is an impotant source of local income, is produced and transported by a network of canals that is limited to a narrow zone within the inner bark, a fact that can help to inform and improve tapping methods. See Tolera et al.
A stem of Boswellia papyrifera in Ethiopia being tapped in order to collect frankincense, a gum-resin that the tree exudes when the bark is wounded. The resin, which is an impotant source of local income, is produced and transported by a network of canals that is limited to a narrow zone within the inner bark, a fact that can help to inform and improve tapping methods. See Tolera et al.

A reminder that a year after publication, Annals of Botany papers become free access. You can read about Boswellia tapping in Tolera et al’s paper, or you can see the issue’s contents page for somewhat more than just three wise men and women.

  • Thank you for the note on access. I pinned, tweeted, and scooped it (see the scoop here: http://scoop.it/t/ecoscifi).

    Would you be interested in submitting a blog post or two for possible inclusion in a blog carnival on plants? The carnival will be for February posts. The theme is “Botanical Warfare: Parasites, Stranglers, Chemists, and Thieves.” Let me know, and I will send details.

    Garry