Remote tropical island colonization does not preclude symbiotic specialists

For symbiotic organisms, their colonization and spread across remote oceanic islands should favour generalists. Plants that form obligate symbiotic associations with microbes dominate island ecosystems, but the relationship between island inhabitance and symbiotic specificity is unclear, especially in the tropics. To fill this gap, Swift et al. examined the mycorrhizal specificity of the Hawaiian endemic orchid Anoectochilus sandvicensis across multiple populations encompassing its entire geographic distribution.

Micrographs of root cross-sections from Anoectochilus sandvicensis
Micrographs of root cross-sections from Anoectochilus sandvicensis, (A) ×20 magnification of fungal pelotons within orchid root cells, (B) ×40 detail of fungal hyphae that make up the pelotons within the root cells of A. sandvicensis.

Micrographs of root cross-sections from Anoectochilus sandvicensis, (A) ×20 magnification of fungal pelotons within orchid root cells, (B) ×40 detail of fungal hyphae that make up the pelotons within the root cells of A. sandvicensis.

The authors found that each population of A. sandvicensis forms specific associations with one of three fungi in the genus Ceratobasidium and that the closest relatives of these fungi are globally widespread. Based on diversity indices, A. sandvicensis populations were estimated to partner with one to four mycorrhizal taxa with an estimated total of four compatible mycorrhizal fungi across its entire distribution. However, the geographic proximity of orchid populations was not a significant predictor of mycorrhizal fungal community composition.

Swift et al.’s findings indicate that the colonization and survival of plant species on even the most remote oceanic islands is not restricted to symbiotic generalists, and that partnering with few, but cosmopolitan microbial symbionts is an alternative means for successful island establishment. They suggest that the spatial distribution and abundance of symbionts in addition to island age, size and isolation should also be taken into consideration for predictions of island biodiversity.

Further reading

Swift, S., Munroe, S., Im, C., Tipton, L., & Hynson, N. A. (2018). Remote tropical island colonization does not preclude symbiotic specialists: new evidence of mycorrhizal specificity across the geographic distribution of the Hawaiian endemic orchid Anoectochilus sandvicensis. Annals of Botany. https://doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcy198