AoBBlog and Botany One

What happened to AoBBlog and why Botany One? We’re evolving.
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Over the weekend we’ve been busy changing the name and the address of this site from AoBBlog to Botany One. It’s part of a process of tidying up all our social media handles. We remain a weblog owned by the Annals of Botany Company, a charity set up to promote Botany internationally. However, with this new name we might be able to do that a bit better.

The reason we took the name AoBBlog originally was that we wanted to be open that we were owned by the Annals of Botany Company. There was a reason why so many of our posts were related to papers from either Annals of Botany or AoB PLANTS. However, it’s not just those two journals that contribute posts to the blog. Thanks to Danielle Marias and Joseph Stinziano, we’ve had input from Tree Physiology for years.

We’d like to expand our coverage of research in other journals, as well increase our own independent production. But we know that some potential contributors have wondered if they have to be connected to an AoB journal. We hope the name change will reflect that we want to cover anything of interest to a plant biology audience.
Following the change of name for the blog, we’re making these other changes:

  • Twitter: The blog is moving to @botanyone from @annbot. There will be a new @annbot account covering just the Annals of Botany.
  • Facebook: The name has changed to Botany One instead of the Annals of Botany name we have had till now.
  • LinkedIn: AoBBlog has changed to Botany One.

We also have a plan to promote older posts. Often we’ll say on Facebook that a paper will be free access after a year. It’s a policy that plenty of other journals share. If we blog a paper that will be becoming free access, then we’ll try to repromote the post when the paper is free. We’ll be putting the posts on Instagram @botany_too and on our Tumblr Botany Too.

You’re welcome to comment and complain about the new name below. For context, names that we rejected included: Axis of Botany, Botany & Beyond, and Alright Orchid?


Also published on Medium.


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3 COMMENTS

  1. Hi,

    I would be careful using “-bot” as the last syllable of a blog or web site. “Bot” is in common use in those contexts to mean “robot” — an automatic posting or search program. The confusion is alleviated by using “bot” in any position except the terminal one.

    • Thanks. We’re using annbot for the Annals of Botany Twitter handle because the journal has traditionally been abbreviated to Ann. Bot.. Also, with having use @annbot for the blog, it’s probably a bad idea to leave it vacant for a pornbot to grab.

Comments are closed.