Asymmetrical root development as a reaction to abiotic stresses

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Roots can develop resilience and protective barriers to drought and cadmium-induced (Cd) stress. Líška et al. study the ways in which the vascular tissues of roots develop characteristics to mitigate the effects of local abiotic stressors.

Maize primary root (Zea mays L., hybrid ‘Reduta’) exposed to unilateral treatment by drought (Air) and attached to wet agar-solified MS medium (Agar) on the other side.
Maize primary root (Zea mays L., hybrid ‘Reduta’) exposed to unilateral treatment by drought (Air) and attached to wet agar-solified MS medium (Agar) on the other side. See Líška et al. (2016) for full details.

They report that contact with air, or with toxic metals such as cadmium, induces an earlier and asymmetrical development of the cell wall polymer suberin lamellae in both the endodermis and the exodermis on the exposed side of the primary root surface of maize. Suberin provides a barrier to the movement of water and solutes. Moreover, local Cd exposure induces early differentiation of the endodermis in the exposed area and in basipetally localized tissues. As a result of these physiological responses, the root endodermis and exodermis provide protection for the plant’s vascular tissues against abiotic stresses.

Root Biology Issue This paper is part of the Root Biology Special Issue.

Reference

Denis Líška, Michal Martinka, Jana Kohanová, Alexander Lux, 2016, 'Asymmetrical development of root endodermis and exodermis in reaction to abiotic stresses', Annals of Botany, vol. 118, no. 4, pp. 667-674 http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcw047


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