Saving a blueprint of the Tree of Life

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Access to legally acquired, high-quality DNA and tissue samples is often elusive for those undertaking genomic research. Seberg et al. report on an initiative to tackle this problem.

DNA on a wall
DNA. Photo:John Goode / Flickr

The Global Genome Biodiversity Network (GGBN) aims to solve this problem by linking existing biodiversity biorepositories together, sharing common standards and a data portal, which will enable both efficient searching for samples, collected in accordance with national and international conventions and regulations, and identification of gaps across collections. Using the Botanical Gardens Network the Global Genome Initiative-Gardens project aims to add high-quality genetic material to GGBN sourced from a minimum of one species from each of the approximately 460 vascular plant families, and one species from approximately half of the 15 000 vascular plant genera.

This is an Open Access article.

Reference

O. Seberg, G. Droege, K. Barker, J. A. Coddington, V. Funk, M. Gostel, G. Petersen, P. P. Smith, 2016, 'Global Genome Biodiversity Network: saving a blueprint of the Tree of Life – a botanical perspective', Annals of Botany, vol. 118, no. 3, pp. 393-399 http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcw121


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