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Home Journals Annals of Botany Tinkering with transcription factor networks for developmental robustness of Ranunculales flowers

Tinkering with transcription factor networks for developmental robustness of Ranunculales flowers

Species within the Ranunculales bear flowers of formidable variation; for example, one can find novel floral organs and loss of floral organs, zygomorphic and radially symmetric flowers, and variation in floral organ number.

Photos of flowers from plants of diverse orders with a simplified phylogeny above, sketching their relationships. From left to right: Nymphaea colorata (water lily, basal angiosperms); Lilium marthagon (lily, monocot); Triticum aestivum (bread wheat, monocot); Meconopsis horridula (prickly blue poppy, basal eudicot); Antirrhinum majus (snapdragon, fabid); Rosa sp. (rose, malvid)
Photos of flowers from plants of diverse orders with a simplified phylogeny above, sketching their relationships. From left to right: Nymphaea colorata (water lily, basal angiosperms); Lilium marthagon (lily, monocot); Triticum aestivum (bread wheat, monocot); Meconopsis horridula (prickly blue poppy, basal eudicot); Antirrhinum majus (snapdragon, fabid); Rosa sp. (rose, malvid). Image by Becker (2016).

Becker reviews recent developments on the molecular aspects of Ranunculales flower development, focusing especially on aspects not found in Brassicaceae development, such as the ring meristem producing variable numbers of stamens. A new hypothesis for the evolution of the progressively fixed angiosperm floral bauplan is proposed, comparing the genetic interactions observed in Ranunculales with those found in Brassicaceae.

Annals of Botany Officehttp://aob.oxfordjournals.com
The Annals of Botany Office is based at the University of Oxford.

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