Disturbance, density-dependent processes and genetic relatedness

Disturbances, dispersal and biotic interactions are three major drivers of the spatial distribution of genotypes within populations, the last of which has been less studied than the other two.
  • 223
  • 28
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    251
    Shares

Old-growth forest (OG), second-growth forest interior (SGI) and second-growth forest edge (SGE) of Nothofagus pumilio and their schematic representation in a forest colonization gradient.
Old-growth forest (OG), second-growth forest interior (SGI) and second-growth forest edge (SGE) of Nothofagus pumilio and their schematic representation in a forest colonization gradient. Full details in Fajardo et al.

Fajardo et al. examined the role of competition and facilitation on the degree of conspecific genetic relatedness of nearby individuals of tree populations of Nothofagus pumilio following large-scale fires in Patagonia (Chile). They found that trees located in the interior of second-growth forests had significantly lower relatedness suggesting a fading of the recolonization structure by competition, whereas trees located in the edge of the same second-growth forests showed a positive and highly significant relatedness among trees, resulting from facilitation.

Reference

Fajardo, A., Torres-Díaz, C., & Till-Bottraud, I. (2015). Disturbance and density-dependent processes (competition and facilitation) influence the fine-scale genetic structure of a tree species’ population. Annals of Botany, 117(1), 67–77. https://doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcv148


  • 223
  • 28
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    251
    Shares