in

Climate change reduces nectar secretion in two common Mediterranean plants

Ballota acetabulosa growing at the foot of an old terrace in Kythnos Island, Greece (photo by T. Petanidou)
Ballota acetabulosa growing at the foot of an old terrace in Kythnos Island, Greece (photo by T. Petanidou)

The negative effect of climate change on plants and plant–pollinator interactions is a matter of concern worldwide. The Mediterranean region is considered particularly susceptible to climate warming and the communities of this region will need to face considerable climatic changes over the 21st century. In a new study published in AoB PLANTS, Takkis et al. examined the effect of temperature on nectar secretion of two Mediterranean species (Ballota acetabulosa and Teucrium divaricatum) to evaluate their potential responses to climate change and the consequent effect on their pollinators. Their results indicated that both species would handle moderate warming relatively well but would be negatively affected by the strong warming predicted for the end of this century.

Written by AoBPLANTS

AoB PLANTS is an open-access, online journal that publishes peer-reviewed articles on all aspects of environmental and evolutionary biology. Published by Oxford University Press, AoB PLANTS provides a fast-track pathway for publishing high-quality research, where papers are available online to anyone, anywhere free of charge. Reasons to publish in AoB PLANTS include double-blind peer review of manuscripts, rapid processing time and low open-access charges.

Daffodils

Stories of 2015: March

Buddha

Stories of 2015: April