Tiers for souvenirs?

Image: Wikimedia Commons.
Image: Wikimedia Commons.

News of a new-ish plant science journal now. The Open Access online Frontiers in Plant Science, which ‘welcomes outstanding contributions in any field of plant science from applied to basic research, from organismic to molecular studies, from single plant analysis to studies of whole ecosystems, and from biochemical to computational approaches’ was launched in 2010 and is currently into its 2nd volume. Its 12 specialty botanical sections cover Cell Biology; Evolution and Development; Genetics and Genomics; Nutrition; Physiology; Proteomics; Traffic and Transport; Plant–Microbe Interactions; Functional Plant Ecology; Virology; and Technical Advances in Plant Science. It accepts so-called tier 1 articles – Book Reviews, Editorials, General Commentaries, Hypotheses & Theories, Methods, Mini Reviews, Opinions, Original Research, Perspectives, Reviews, Specialty Grand Challenges and Technology Reports. With the added bonus that authors of the highest impact (as judged by ‘many expert readers’) tier 1 Original Research paper will be invited to submit a ‘prestigious Frontiers Focused Review’ – a tier 2 article – in which the original article is re-written in a review style to address the journal’s wider audience across all of plant science. Ultimately, this democratic tiering  is envisaged to have four tiers, each iteration of the original paper being further distilled and re-worked so as to reach the broadest readership. From an interesting publishing idea in one of the newest phytological journals to free stuff from a firmly established plant science publication. The April 2011 issue of The Plant Journal is devoted to ‘The Plant Genome: An Evolutionary View on Structure and Function’. In the words of the journal itself, ‘The genome sequences of more than ten plant species are already available, and the pace is greatly accelerating. But what do these sequences tell us about what makes a plant a plant? The series of articles in this special issue… presents a comprehensive overview of how this wealth of information can help us understand what plant genomes consist of, how they are maintained and transmitted, what functions they specify, and how these evolved to encompass the enormous diversity we encounter nowadays in the plant kingdom’. Special mention must be made of the contribution entitled ‘Organisation of the plant genome in chromosomes’ by the Annals’ very own Pat Heslop-Harrison, and Trude Schwarzacher. Happy reading!